Feature Article: Security vs. Insecurity Part 2

Even the most arrogant among people must admit that there are times when they are not in control of what happens. Security can become insecurity in a matter of moments. Yesterday, I awoke to an email that a friend from high school had suffered a massive stroke, which had left him on life support, clinging very loosely to life. This was the second of our school mates to experience a massive stroke in the recent, few months since we all happily celebrated our 40th high school reunion. We had experienced such a close class during our grade school and high school years. It was a phenomenon about which many people from Evansville spoke. We had to face again the sad news that another of our friends was suffering.

My neighbor is a beautiful woman --- on the inside and out. She and her husband are dear to my family. Recently, they (who are known as quite the dancers - Dancing with the Stars style) attended a formal dinner/dance, and as they were leaving the dance floor, a young man, who is still anonymous, swung around and inadvertently knocked her to the ground. She fell face first (heard a crack); then, on her arm and then, her knee. She was taken to the Emergency Room via ambulance, and when we saw her next, she looked as if she had been in a horrific auto accident. Two months later, she is healing, but her face is still bruised and swollen, with a place that may need surgery to attempt to make it look as close as possible to normal. Her hand and arm have damage to the ligaments which will likely never return to its function. It happened so fast; she did not see it coming nor was she able to brace for it.

Many of you reading this are facing unexpected difficulties of your own. You may be waiting in a doctor’s office to be tested for an illness for which you did not plan. You may be facing a health situation with a parent, and you feel that you are losing your mom or your dad. You may have a child with a life-threatening struggle or a marriage that is less than fulfilling. If you are looking for security in your circumstances, you may need to look again.

My recent readings have brought me to the book of Isaiah in the Bible. It has been a surprising and rewarding journey for me. There is a shelter in the storm. “But now thus says the LORD, he who created you, O Jacob, he who formed you O Israel: Do not fear, for I have redeemed you; I have called you by name, you are mine. When you pass through the waters, I will be with you; and through the rivers, they shall not overwhelm you; when you walk through fire you shall not be burned, and the flame shall not consume you. For I am the LORD your God, the Holy One of Israel, your Savior.” Isaiah 43:1-3a. So, we have a choice. We can choose to be fearful and dismayed or we can choose to trust that the Lord will strengthen and uphold us, as He has promised. Our American heritage brings us to the same place, as in an American Folk Hymn called How Can I Keep from Singing: “No storm can shake my inmost calm while to that Rock I’m clinging; since Love is Lord of heav’n and earth: how can I keep from singing." Arr. Ronald Staheli.

Article by: Marti Starkey
Harrison Moberly, LLP
317-639-4511
www.harrisonmoberly.com

Feature Article: What Would We Hear If We Listened-Part 2

Albert Einstein, the renowned American physicist whose theories of relativity changed our thinking on the nature of time and space, stated, "Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better." (He was a genius and won a Nobel Prize, but he also was dyslexic and failed at traditional schooling in the early years.) This focuses one of the problems of the current age. We have no time to listen nor to be in nature. Professor Einstein died in 1955, but I often wonder what he would say now when most of our "spare" time is spent in front of an iPad or iPhone or desktop computer. When we are away from those devices, we will have the television on or the radio playing. There is very little time spent alone, thinking, in nature.

I personally believe that God wants to speak to us, not verbally, but in our thoughts, impressions, circumstances, and in nature, including the peace He gives us. If we do not spend time alone, without digital device, television and radio, how will we ever hear Him? Oswald Chambers, the author of the beloved and famous book, My Utmost For His Highest, states that "our part is to walk in the light and to obey all that He reveals to [us]." It would be interesting to conduct a personal survey to determine how many minutes of each of our days are spent alone, "walking in the light," without any interference of sound from a device. We do not even have to tell anyone that we are conducting our own personal survey.

The Bible gives much instruction in this. Here is one of my favorites, "This is what The Lord says: 'Stand at the crossroads and look; ask for the ancient paths, ask where the good way is, and walk in it, and you will find rest for your souls.' "Jeremiah 6:16. Taking time in nature helps this process along. It allows us the time and the space to hear what we need to hear from Him; to live the full lives that God intends. It seems that Albert Einstein knew a thing or two.

Article by: Marti Starkey
Read more about Marti
Harrison Moberly, LLP
317-639-4511
www.harrisonmoberly.com